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 Proclaiming the Good News of Jesus Christ to greater Sao Paulo, Brazil

 

 

Welcome, you are about to embark on one of Life's greatest adventures!

        Imagine the earth is a great theater where God produces and directs great drama for His glory.  This drama is being played out on a stage where God is taking back what was lost in the Garden of Eden.  God is rescuing people who have been separated from Him by their sin.  No professional actors are on this stage, just real people like you. 

        God is very active in a part of the theater called “Sao Paulo” where about 20 million people live.  God is producing a masterpiece and we have a chance to get in on it.  You will be no “extra” in this drama; you will have a speaking part.  God will use you to change one person at a time for His glory. 

        God is directing and the heavenly hosts are the audience for this cosmic theater.  This is the most fun you can have in a lifetime.  Being a part of changing the world – one person at a time. God has a role for you in Sao Paulo!  God sees you as a world-changer! 

 

GUIDELINES FOR BRAZIL TRIP 2016

 1.   Do not let anything bother you.  Be fluid, flexible.  Expect  changes.

2.   We are a team; we are in this together.  Consider how your actions will affect the team.  Be on time so as not to keep your teammates waiting.  If you see a problem or something concerns you, mention it in a team meeting or to the team Leader.  This is not an invitation to whine or complain.  No bellyaching.

3.   We travel on tourist visas.  We are guests and must comply  with Brazilian, cultural and host requirements, which may be different from ours. Do not engage in any conduct that will reflect badly on us, on the USA, on our mission, or on Jesus Christ.

4.   Try to accomplish all tasks requested by your host that are within your ability.  Try never say you are too tired to make a visit or to present the Gospel.  Try to make every appointment and take every opportunity to share the Gospel. 

5.   Be prepared to present the Gospel and personal testimony at any time.  Any form of  Gospel presentation is acceptable if it has the essential points.  You may read a tract, use a chart, recite from memory, or just tell the story.  Ladies will likely give testimonies at services where men are preaching. Keep testimony to about 3 minutes in English.  See page 36 for a form to prepare your testimony. 

6.   If you are not comfortable doing what is asked of you, explain your problem, consult with a more experienced team member, and/or try to offer alternative action.  If you are uncertain about doing a request, ask the Team Leader before taking action.  Avoid causing harm to the ministry and to the believers in Brazil who will continue the work after we are gone. 

7.   Use a booklet or notebook to record each witnessing event.  Write names in the book and keep track of decisions.  You will need to report results. 

8.   You are encouraged to take gifts to pastors, translators, guides, house hosts and others who help you.  This is a cultural expectation.  We try to leave a tract with everyone involved in a sharing event.    

9.   Allow the host to assign translators.  If you desire a certain translator, consult with the Team Leader.  Translators are believers and can be helpful beyond translating your  message.  Follow your translator’s advice if reasonable.  Some translators may have different beliefs, such as you cannot be a Christian if you smoke or drink alcohol. Agree with your translator at the outset that differences should be discussed in private after the visit. We will discuss this with translators en masse. 

10.   Be careful about making promises to the host church, or to interpreters and guides, concerning anything you will do or even try to do after leaving Brazil.  Promising to try to contact a relative or friend upon return to USA is okay. 

11.  Be careful of hand signals; they may mean something different in Brazil.  Thumbs up is good.  To motion someone to come toward you, put arm and palm down and ove palm toward yourself. 

12.  Dress modestly; no shorts or mini skirts.  For women:  business dress in worship services; slacks, capris and jeans are okay for other activities; bring at least one (1) dress.  For men: a coat and tie may be expected for preaching in church; golf shirts, sport shirts, jeans and slacks are okay for other activities.  Avoid wearing expensive or flashy jewelry, or strong fragrances. 

13.  Do not discuss political issues.  Do not criticize the Brazilian government.      

14.  Do not make statements that reflect badly on conditions in Brazil.  Don’t mention odors, unsightly conditions, shortage/lack of things.  Avoid making comparisons   between USA and Brazil.  For instance, do not say, “Almost everyone in the USA has a car.”  Do not make statements about your affluence or USA’s affluence. eep most of your money out of sight. 

15.  Make friends with the church people and translators; get to know them on a personal level.  Consider them your teammates, and show respect for them. Find out about their lives.  Enjoy music with them if you are so inclined. 

16.  You will probably eat most dinners at your host church or at the home of a member of that church.  If something needs to be done, pitch in.    

19.  Hotel rooms  will probably have both 110 and 220 volt outlets.  Take voltage converter and adapter if you have them.  Check voltage before you plug in appliance. 

20.  Most of all:  HAVE FUN.  Sharing the Gospel and helping change the world one person at a time is the most fun you can have in life.  Don’t miss the FUN.  

10.   Be careful about making promises to the host church, or to interpreters and guides, concerning anything you will do or even try to do after leaving Brazil.  Promising o try to contact a relative or friend upon return to USA is okay. 

11.  Be careful of hand signals; they may mean something different in Brazil.  Thumbs up is good.  To motion someone to come toward you, put arm and palm down and move palm toward yourself. 

12.  Dress modestly; no shorts or mini skirts.  For women:  business dress in worship services; slacks, capris and jeans are okay for other activities; bring at least one (1) dress.  For men: a coat and tie may be expected for preaching in church; golf shirts, sport shirts, jeans and slacks are okay for other activities.  Avoid wearing expensive

or flashy jewelry, or strong fragrances. 

13.  Do not discuss political issues.  Do not criticize the Brazilian government.      

14.  Do not make statements that reflect badly on conditions in Brazil.  Don’t mention odors, unsightly conditions, shortage/lack of things.  Avoid making comparisons   between USA and Brazil.  For instance, do not say, “Almost everyone in the USA has a car.”  Do not make statements about your affluence or USA’s affluence.         Keep most of your money out of sight. 

15.  Make friends with the church people and translators; get to know them on a personal level.  Consider them your teammates, and show respect for them. Find out about their lives.  Enjoy music with them if you are so inclined. 

16.  You will probably eat most dinners at your host church or at the home of a member of that church.  If something needs to be done, pitch in.    

19.  Hotel rooms  will probably have both 110 and 220 volt outlets.  Take voltage converter and adapter if you have them.  Check voltage before you plug in appliance.

20.  Most of all:  HAVE FUN.  Sharing the Gospel and helping change the world one person at a time is the most fun you can have in life.  Don’t miss the FUN.